Clauses of concession (yielding) show a contrast between two ideas. They are introduced by although, even though, though, despite, or in spite of.

DESPITE/IN SPITE OF

These are preposition which can be used interchangeably. They mean the same as although, etc.; however, the grammar is different. They can got at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence.


Despite his physical handicap, he has become a successful businessman.

In spite of his physical handicap, he has become a successful businessman.

Jane will be admitted to the university despite her bad grades.

Jane will be admitted to the university in spite of her bad grades.

ALTHOUGH/ EVEN THOUGH/ THOUGH

These are subordinate conjuctions used to connect two clauses. Notice how grammar is different from that of despite and in spite of.


Although he has a physical handicap, he has become a successful businessman.

Jane will be admitted to the university even though she has bad grades.

In spite of the bad weather, we are going to have a picnic.

Although the weather was very bad, we had a picnic.

Note:

Despite his physical handicap, he has become a successful businessman. (Now, he is a successful businessman). This is an example of Present Perfect Tense.

In spite of the bad weather, we are going to have a picnic. (going to is related with plan. The sentence will use going to if the subject has a plan). If the subject has not a plan, the sentence will use “probably” or “will”)